COVID-19: South Africa suspends Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

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Clive Grenville
Clive Grenville
7 months ago

BEWARE the very real possibility of the vaccine being made mandatory

T G
T G
7 months ago

As long as the waste is paid for…

Susan Keelan
Susan Keelan
7 months ago

Did that needle go in her arm

Hell N Degenerates
Hell N Degenerates
7 months ago

This vaccination programme is a "trial/experiment"
All involved will be on trial in the future for assisting in genocide, the doctors nurses manufacturers politicians are war criminals.

Chris j
Chris j
7 months ago

Well done South Africa

Matthew
Matthew
7 months ago

I'm worried about next month's Martian varient that can infect people telepathically especially if it mixes with the upcoming interdemesional varient.

Szabolcs Ács
Szabolcs Ács
7 months ago

There are some mutation from Brazil and South Africa. These two countries where Oxford / Astra Zeneca vaccines were in clinical trials.
VERY INTERESTING!!!
So the vaccines might be causing mutation… THINKING before you get a jab!

MastaDJMax
MastaDJMax
7 months ago

I know it's a matter of taste and preferences, but I gotta say, I hated the background melody…

The Great Convid scamdemic
The Great Convid scamdemic
7 months ago

British propaganda. Not as good as it used to be.

CommodoreLezmo
CommodoreLezmo
7 months ago

A large quantity of people don't want an mRNA gene therapy jab so let's discredit the AstraZeneca vaccine as less effective to increase uptake.

Mobbdeepak McMacaveli Shakoor
Mobbdeepak McMacaveli Shakoor
7 months ago

Seroquel Scandals
Early on, the company had a history of playing it safe. In the 1970s, Astra saw the future of antidepressants. It developed the first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) called zimelidine, and began selling it 1982. But the drug produced a rare side effect that could damage the nervous system, and the company recalled it a year later. By recalling zimelidine, it avoided potential catastrophic losses from possible lawsuits.

But it had already received harsh criticism for its involvement in scandals for its blockbuster antipsychotics, Seroquel and Seroquel XR. Critics say the company was more focused on maximizing profits while it still had the patent on the drug than on patient and trial participant safety.

In addition to paying $350 million to resolve more than 23,000 lawsuits that allege Seroquel can cause diabetes, the company paid to settle illegal marketing charges. It also faced a number of scandals including corrupt data in studies for marketing the drug to children, a sex scandal and a poorly run clinical trial that could have compromised patient safety and data reliability.

Marketing Seroquel for Children
Dr. Melissa DelBello was the lead author of a ground-breaking 2002 study that found AstraZeneca’s atypical antipsychotic Seroquel (quetiapine) was safe for use in children. AstraZeneca financed the study which included 30 children diagnosed with bipolar disorder. In the end, only eight children taking Seroquel completed the trial, and DelBello determined the study was inconclusive

However, the study was published anyway and concluded Seroquel was more effective in children than a test group not receiving the drug. The publication led to a national recommendation that atypical antipsychotics be the leading choice for children with bipolar disorder.

FACT
AstraZeneca covered up study results that revealed Seroquel was either inconclusive or harmful.
Other studies involving Seroquel produced inconclusive or harmful results. Those were never published. It was later revealed that AstraZeneca systematically covered up the results. A company email used as evidence in a court case revealed: “Thus far, we have buried trials 15, 31, 56. The larger issue is how do we face the outside world when they begin to criticize us for suppressing data.”

In 2002, U.S. Sen. Charles Grassley criticized DelBello for receiving at least $238,000 in consulting fees and travel costs from AstraZeneca.

After years of investigations, AstraZeneca paid a $520 million fine brought by the U.S. Department of Justice for promoting Seroquel for unapproved uses. The company also paid $647 million to settle global lawsuits for failing to warn the public of Seroquel’s side effects.

‘Sex-for-Studies’ Seroquel Scandal
In 2009, a Florida lawsuit claimed then U.S. medical director for Seroquel Dr. Wayne MacFadden had sexual relationships with a clinical researcher who wrote journal articles favorable to Seroquel and a medical marketer who promoted Seroquel. The case was one of 9,000 claiming people developed diabetes and gained weight while on the drug.

Plaintiffs said these relationships were improper because research was supposed to be independent of AstraZeneca. MacFadden also had sexual relationships with employees of competitors and asked for trade secrets, CBS News and MedPage Today reported.

“The mere existence of these relationships calls into question the integrity of the scientific work product of those involved,” according to documents written by plaintiffs’ attorneys in 2009.

E-mails also surfaced showing AstraZeneca’s publications manager John Tumas buried three clinical trials with unfavorable Seroquel clinical data.

Poorly Organized Clinical Trial
In 2014, a Seroquel XR trial for borderline personality disorder headed by Dr. S. Charles Schultz faced scrutiny because of poor oversight, the New York Times reported. AstraZeneca paid Schultz, the head of the department of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota, to conduct the trial. In addition, he received more than $112,000 for “speaking and consulting fees and other payments” from 2002 to 2007.

Because of lack of supervision, two participants at a facility for sex offenders were able to fake their way into the trial. One of these men slipped Seroquel XR to unsuspecting staff and residents. The men were removed from the trial, but no one followed up with an investigation.

Following the Seroquel XR trial debacle, Schultz stepped down as head of psychiatry at the university.

Despite the sloppy trial and about one third of the participants dropping out because of side effects, results published in the American Journal of Psychiatry showed the drug as a promising treatment for borderline personality disorder. AstraZeneca didn’t pursue formal approval from the FDA, however.

Prior to this trial, the University of Minnesota ran a Seroquel trial in 2004, and one participant, Dan Markingson, committed suicide while on the drug.

AstraZeneca’s Drug Side Effect Litigation
In addition to AstraZeneca’s antipsychotic controversy, it also faced growing legal problems from some of its blockbuster medications. People who took some of the company’s best-selling drugs say the drugmaker failed to warn of side effects.

Crestor
Crestor 10mg Pills
Crestor 10mg pill
The cholesterol drug Crestor (rosuvastatin) is used to prevent or treat heart disease, heart attacks and strokes.

People harmed by Crestor took AstraZeneca to court, claiming in lawsuits the drug contained dangerous defects. A consumer advocacy group also called for the recall of Crestor from the U.S. market but no recall was ordered.

Onglyza & Kombiglyze XR
Onglyza 5mg Pills
Onglyza 5mg pill
The FDA approved Onglyza (saxagliptin) in 2009 to treat Type 2 diabetes. AstraZeneca and partner Bristol-Myers Squibb made hundreds of millions of dollars annually from Onglyza, but a study reported Onglyza increased the risk of hospitalizations due to heart failure. The FDA warned of the increased risk in April 2015.

A month later, a woman claimed her mother died from heart failure caused by Onglyza and filed a lawsuit against AstraZeneca. Now more lawsuits are mounting for Onglyza and heart failure.

Farxiga
Farxiga 10mg pill
Farxiga 10mg pill
The FDA rejected Bristol-Myers and AstraZeneca’s once-daily Farxiga (dapagliflozin) before approving it in 2014. The FDA had originally denied it because data in studies showed a possible risk of bladder cancer.

After the FDA released several warnings linking the drug to serious side effects, numerous law firms are analyzing cases from people who suffered from ketoacidosis, kidney problems, UTIs or other conditions possibly caused by Farxiga…

Mobbdeepak McMacaveli Shakoor
Mobbdeepak McMacaveli Shakoor
7 months ago

If you type into Google, Rockefeller Foundation lockstep pdf and you got to the second result titled Scenarios for the future of technology and international development (which is a 54 page document) and go to page 18 you will see the that this was all planned long ago. The document used to be available on the Rockefeller Foundation website but they appear to have removed it and left some kind of disclaimer, reassuring us that they are the good guys and that they are not trying to introduce a global police state.

Rockefeller Foundation

LOCK STEP

Scenario
Narratives

A world of tighter top-down government control and more

authoritarian leadership, with limited innovation and growing

citizen pushback

In 2012, the pandemic that the world had been
anticipating for years finally hit. Unlike 2009’s

H1N1, this new influenza strain—originating from wild geese—was extremely virulent and deadly. Even the most pandemic-prepared nations were quickly overwhelmed when the virus streaked around the world, infecting nearly 20 percent of the global population and killing 8 million in just seven months, the majority of them healthy young adults. The pandemic also

had a deadly effect on economies: international mobility of both people and goods screeched to

a halt, debilitating industries like tourism and
breaking global supply chains. Even locally, normally bustling shops and office buildings sat empty for months, devoid of both employees and customers.

The pandemic blanketed the planet—though disproportionate numbers died in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Central America, where the virus spread like wildfire in the absence of official containment protocols. But even in developed countries, containment was a challenge. The United States’s initial policy of
“strongly discouraging” citizens from flying proved deadly in its leniency, accelerating the spread of the virus not just within the U.S. but across borders. However, a few countries did

fare better—China in particular. The Chinese government’s quick imposition and enforcement

of mandatory quarantine for all citizens, as well as its instant and near-hermetic sealing off of all borders, saved millions of lives, stopping the spread of the virus far earlier than in other countries and enabling a swifter post-pandemic recovery.
(This is just a small section, if you go to page 18 of the pdf document and start from there, the whole plan is written out.)

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